Design for our times: DesignSingapore Council launched two books on designing for the elderly

Singapore’s National Population and Talent Division released a report on September 30 (Wednesday) about population statistics as of June 2015. The report said that Singaporeans aged 65 and above make up 13.1% of the population, up by 0.7% from last year. What does this mean? For every 4.9 citizens within the age bracket of 20-64, […]

Design for our times: DesignSingapore Council launched two books on designing for the elderly

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Singapore’s National Population and Talent Division released a report on September 30 (Wednesday) about population statistics as of June 2015. The report said that Singaporeans aged 65 and above make up 13.1% of the population, up by 0.7% from last year.

What does this mean?

For every 4.9 citizens within the age bracket of 20-64, there is a citizen aged 65 or older.

By 2030, one in five Singaporeans will be a senior citizen.

A timely response from the DesignSingapore Council (DSg) was launched this morning. Two books, available for free on www.designsingapore.org, explain the statistics and the subject matter of ageing, and present design solutions to improve the lives of the elderly. Design for Ageing Gracefully, developed by international experience design firm Experentia suggests design solutions for public service (healthcare and social service) delivery. Empathetic Technology for Ageing, developed by award-winning consultancy Orcadesign and innovation firm SupraCopula, offers design solutions and innovations not only for tech products, but urban and interior design as well.

Why are these books relevant to us? More and more, in Lookbox Living and other Indesign Media publications, we come across and feature three-generational homes. You, our readers, live with someone who is elderly. How do we design our homes to be more elderly-friendly? Empathetic Technology for Ageing has some very practical applications, for example:

  1. Provide non-intrusive wireless and interactive monitoring (especially for your elderly who prefer to live on their own) so that you can remind them, or they can inform you immediately, to take their medication, go for their exercise or medical appointments, etc.
  2. Create a comforting (not only comfortable) environment with motion-detecting automated lamps and mood-enhancing dimmers and colour-changing lights.
  3. Consider their limited mobility by incorporating grab bars, wider access ways and corridors for their walkers or wheelchairs, and even self-adjusting toilets and beds.

Whether you are an interior designer or a homeowner with an ageing parent, the design principles in the book will help you create a home that’s inclusive of your ageing loved ones. Download your free from DesignSingapore now.


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